sheryl yu lin http://sherylyulin.com user experience & interaction design Sat, 16 Mar 2013 20:34:14 +0000 en hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.3.2 SXSWi 2012: The Lean Startup: The Science of Entrepreneurship http://sherylyulin.com/2012/03/19/sxswi-2012-the-lean-startup-the-science-of-entrepreneurship/ http://sherylyulin.com/2012/03/19/sxswi-2012-the-lean-startup-the-science-of-entrepreneurship/#comments Mon, 19 Mar 2012 19:42:23 +0000 sheryl http://sherylyulin.com/?p=1479 Speaker: Eric Reis, Author of The Lean Startup (@ericreis) This was a fantastic talk by the author of the best-seller "The Lean Startup" - Eric Reis. I wanted to attend this session as wanted to learn how concepts from lean startups could be applied to the UX process, as per the thoughts of Jeff Gotthelf on "Lean UX" at last year's SXSW. I haven't read the book yet, and I'm sure a lot of what was mentioned at this talk is in the book. But this talk made me want to read it. My notes on the talk below - I have yet to find the slidedeck for this one, but there are similar slidedecks up on Slideshare Speaker: Eric Reis, Author of The Lean Startup (@ericreis)

This was a fantastic talk by the author of the best-seller “The Lean Startup” – Eric Reis. I wanted to attend this session as wanted to learn how concepts from lean startups could be applied to the UX process, as per the thoughts of Jeff Gotthelf on “Lean UX” at last year’s SXSW.

I haven’t read the book yet, and I’m sure a lot of what was mentioned at this talk is in the book. But this talk made me want to read it. My notes on the talk below – I have yet to find the slidedeck for this one, but there are similar slidedecks up on Slideshare.



The Startup Journey: The Movie


The greatest startup movie of all time is not “The Social Network”, but rather, “Ghostbusters” – according to Reis. It has all the elements of the startup story.

But the most important part of the story is the photo montage in the movie. Where the movie glosses over these details because it’s “the boring stuff” – this is the part we need to get better at.

A startup is an experiment.

But the biggest question of our time is not “What can we build?” but rather “What should we build?”.

Because realistically, we can probably build anything we want. But we need to stop wasting people’s time. We need to stop building the wrong things.

The reality is: MOST STARTUPS FAIL.
Most of Ries’ startups have failed. It comes with the territory. Failure is a necessary part of entrepreneurship.

Who to blame: Frederick Taylor and “scientific management”.

This kind of management relies on planning and forecasting. But it only works if you have a long and stable system to base the forecasting off.

These tools of management are failing us. We need a new toolkit of entrepreneurial management from which startups can work.

The Pivot

Successful founders when they run into difficulties, are able to keep one foot anchored
while changing one other thing.

Startups need to reduce the time between pivots in order to make the most of the money we have left. A pivot allows you to increase the runway without needing more money.

Achieving failure = successfully executing a bad design.
Many companies do this. What is the point of finishing a product that nobody wants?

Ries is inspired by ideas from lean manufacturing. Lean manufacturing is about eliminating waste in companies.
In these models, the customer is the most important part of the production line.

However, Entrepreneurs don’t often know who the customer is.
They have hypotheses of who the customer is.

So what do they do? They need to go through cycles of validated learning, where they can learn if the idea is brilliant or crazy.

The question should be:

Does it help me learn faster? Learning is our primary unit of progress.

Entrepreneurs need to learn faster, build faster, measure faster.

Innovation Accounting

Ries is inspired by the book: The Toyota Way, because Toyota is driven by their commitment to long term thinking.

Accountability is one of the most important aspects of startups.

The process:
1. Establish the baseline
2. Tune the baseline
3. Pivot or persevere

We need to build a minimum viable product. Find out if the uptake is 0%. Establish the baseline.
Because if your uptake is 0, all your other projected numbers will be 0. You need to find out if the uptake is 0 as soon as possible.

Try to get the baseline numbers to move up by tuning the engine.

Then find out whether you should pivot or persevere.
Schedule a meeting every six weeks to discuss whether you should pivot or persevere. This way, you can work backwards to figure out what information you need to bring for that meeting.

Entrepreneurs need to move away from vanity metrics to actionable metrics.

Remember that a pivot is a change in strategy NOT a change in vision.
We test to find out how consumers BEHAVE. And use this to refine the vision.

Another book mentioned worth reading is: The Founder’s Dilemma

A single MVP won’t tell you anything. It requires a series of experiments to find out what is going on.

Build test learn is NOT optimization. The question is: Is our strategy GOOD? Does it change customer behaviour? We care about engagement. About change in customer behaviour. A good design is one that changes customer behaviour for the better.




Sketchnotes from Oglivy



Unofficial audio via Lanyrd


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SXSWi 2012: Designing for Context http://sherylyulin.com/2012/03/19/sxswi-2012-designing-for-context/ http://sherylyulin.com/2012/03/19/sxswi-2012-designing-for-context/#comments Mon, 19 Mar 2012 18:22:10 +0000 sheryl http://sherylyulin.com/?p=1453 Panel speakers: Andrew Crow - VP Experience Design at GE (@AndrewCrow) Ben Fullerton - Director of Interaction Design at Method (@benfu) Leah Buley - Design Strategist at Intuit (@ugleah) Nate Bolt - of Bolt Peters UX (@boltron) Ryan Freitas - Cofounder of about.me (@ryanchris) The hashtag: #DforC This all-star panel formed a great start to SXSWi 2012, on the all important topic of context and why it is critical to the design process. The crew outlined 5 key themes to consider, and highlighted personal examples to showcase these themes.

Panel speakers:
Andrew Crow – VP Experience Design at GE (
@AndrewCrow)
Ben Fullerton – Director of Interaction Design at Method (@benfu)
Leah Buley – Design Strategist at Intuit (@ugleah)
Nate Bolt – of Bolt Peters UX (@boltron)
Ryan Freitas – Cofounder of about.me (@ryanchris)

The hashtag: #DforC
Notes and slides below.


Context is affected by location, time, multiple use cases, people – to name a few.

How do we research and design for context that doesn’t lead to hypothetical answers?

Designing for difficult contexts

The panel first some of the most difficult types of contexts they have designed for.

Ben could not disclose the work he was working on. But mentioned the difficulty was, due to the highly private nature of the work, designing based on pure generalisations of people and trying to form meaningful experiences based on little knowledge.

Andrew described a project he worked on at Adaptive Path for astronauts in space, and recounted the odd environments they were dealing with: zero gravity, cosmic radiation that would fry the electronics of devices.

Leah described her work less “glamorous”, like, designing a mobile app that people use to check their finances whilst on the toilet.

Mobile first vs. Browser first

The panel discussed that there is a vogue for mobile first now – but questioned what happens when you develop for browser first.

They discussed that there are opportunities to see what behaviours arise in browser first. Moving into mobile, they had to figure out what behaviours were appropriate in the mobile context, and prioritise them.

Some in the panel believed that you don’t need to map the existing experience across to mobile. It becomes an ecosystem rather than having redundant system.

The example used was About.me, which began as browser first, and the mobile version was not a direct one to one mapping.

Five themes when designing for context

Time

Time affects every interaction we design. Interactions can range from a long term engagement or short term, to snackable. What affordances do we need to build in?

Leah spoke about the luxurious belief that people don’t get interrupted. The reality is, users go away, live real life and come back. The experience isn’t always chronological. She describe designing from micro moments through to crazy long timelines with legacy products.

The NY Times example
For the NY Times redesign project they didn’t want to tackle personas in the usual way, as they felt personas did not give enough information about the true context of the user.

What they did was intercept users when they are in the middle of usage – intercepting different contexts, and presenting open ended questions. They watched people live, in the moment, watching them type their responses.

What was great about this was that they were getting in the participant’s timeline.

NOW is an important time in the timeline

When breaking down a complicated experience, nothing should be held as sacred.

As we engage with products over time, our relationship with the product changes.
We can outgrow products, or products can grow into product suites.

Ecosystem

We can’t design for one product anymore. We need to be aware of how it integrates in different ecosystems, even competitive ecosystems.

In work done for the Teaching Channel, Method has to understand all of the other activities teachers had to engage in to truly form an understanding of the time pressures on teachers and how these activities related to the site they were building.

In work for Mint, Intuit was looking at bringing their product from web native to the mobile context. In thinking about their mobile users, they realised that they could not just assume that people were hitting ALL
touch points in the ecosystem. Sometimes you can’t just scale down the features for mobile. What if mobile is the only face they are interacting with?

Furthermore, the work done for the iPad was very visually striking, and it forced the team to retrofit the others products they had. If you start designing well for one arm of the ecosystem, you have to consider its effects on other systems.

The panel then discussed startups, who often don’t have budgets to do field research.
For Rdio, they looked at combining different methods – guerilla research style.
They conducted quick and casual research with 50 people with a task to gather insights.
They then took 5 people and gave them task a bit more formal
They then used online UT system. Sometimes even got people to hold their device up to webcam.
What this accomplished was they could get a little more concrete picture and a bit of data for very little money.

Location

How do we accommodate and embrace various locations?
Thinking about location helps provide a frame of reference of external factors.

For Victoria’s secret, the iPad and iPhone app ended up being two completely different apps because the target audience had two different needs and reasons for engaging with the products and the with the brand.
No one brings their iPad to the store, but they bring their phone with them. The mobile app works in
context with the location of the store. Users could cnapshot the UPC code and get more info about the product including stock info and more info on the product.

At Intuit they exposed other ways to think about location through an app that enables accountants to look up tax info on the go. Mobility in this case was just around the office – walking from one desk to another.

This is where service design tools are very useful for IXD as it exposes opportunities for design.

Streaming a field observation live is an incredible way to get clients or the team to get
engaged. Live action gets people excited!

Generally: consider legibility of designs when outside a lit room and in the environment it is going
to be used in.

Form and Technology

What about screensize, input methods, and technical considerations?

Leah spoke about the Turbo tax – Snap Tax app, where you can take a photo of your tax and it will input all the relevant fields in the form for you.Though it actually takes longer to snap photo of your tax than inputting it, the wow factor of the form factor made this route appealing for users. They still offered both methods of either manual input or taking a photo.

How can you come up with ideas to make the most of the form/technology?
1. Make a list of features
2. Make a list of inbuilt capabilities of the new device
3. Look at the intersection of these two lists and brainstorm the ways you can use the intersection.

Brand and Relationships

BRANDS AND RELATIONSHIPS
How you feel about a brand affects how you feel about using the product.
When you have a brand that wants to establish an equitable relationship, you have the potential for really meaningful experiences.

Key Learnings

  • If you’re going to extend your existing product, how do you breakout pieces of the experience you want and make it appropriate? Don’t try and just replicate the experience from one context, but consider one on one
    mapping.
  • Explore a service design mentality, and this will help you figure out whether people may
    be coming through only one device. Especially if people only use your product in one context.
  • Exposé the matrix. How do these contexts all overlap? Think about the opportunities at these intersections.
  • Find quick and easy ways to get on the user’s timeline.

The Slidedeck – from dforc.org

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Book: Business Model Generation from a UX lens http://sherylyulin.com/2012/02/29/business-model-generation/ http://sherylyulin.com/2012/02/29/business-model-generation/#comments Wed, 29 Feb 2012 23:43:14 +0000 sheryl http://sherylyulin.com/?p=1446 Business Model Generation by Alexander Osterwalder & Yves Pigneur

Whilst not strictly a UX book, Business Model Generation came into my radar after completing a workshop at UX Australia on Turbocharging your Workshops with Andy Budd of Clearleft.

The book itself is beautiful in the way it was created: It is co-created by the 470 ]]> Business Model Generation by Alexander Osterwalder & Yves Pigneur

Whilst not strictly a UX book, Business Model Generation came into my radar after completing a workshop at UX Australia on Turbocharging your Workshops with Andy Budd of Clearleft.

The book itself is beautiful in the way it was created: It is co-created by the 470 members of the Business Model Innovation Hub, which is a true testament to one of the key aspects of designing business models – collaboration. It’s also been put together as a very visual resource that can serve as a handbook for future reference.

The book is broken into five distinct parts:
Canvas: Describing the Business Model Canvas tool
Patterns: Outlining several model patterns with real world examples
Design: Outlining several techniques and methodologies used to design business models
Strategy: Insights into strategic approaches for designing business models
Process: Tying all the aspects together

So why read this book, if you’re not really intending to create business models yourself?

Firstly, there are many parallels between the business model design process, and the processes we use in user experience.

But most importantly, I’ve always believed that the role of the UX practitioner is often as the mediator – though we uniquely see things through a users lens, we also have a solid understanding of business needs and possible obstructions, of technical limitations, of budget constraints, and the list goes on.

This book provides the ability to draw on the business lens part of our role, and allows us to speak the same language as business stakeholders. Even if we are not involved in shaping the business model (and often, we’re not), it’s important to demonstrate to business stakeholders a strong understanding of their business model. This can help to build confidence in your abilities to achieve a great solution that takes into consideration all aspects of a project – not just the user’s needs.

The Business Model Canvas
The Business Model Canvas tool itself is like a super-charged context map. Often the activities a UX architect performs at the “discovery” phase of a project will involve understanding the context of the project. Involving business stakeholders at the beginning of the project is critical to stakeholder management, as it provides an early platform for them to be heard.

Filling out a Business Model Canvas with stakeholders – overlaid with a SWOT analysis, could be a great exercise in understanding how they see the business working, and where the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats lie.

Business model patterns
The book outlines several business model patterns with real world applications. This part of the book is simply fascinating and truly shows how business models must continually evolve in order for companies to continue to succeed.

Techniques for designing business models
The techniques mentioned in the book will sound very familiar to a UX designer: customer insights, ideation, visual thinking, prototyping, storytelling, scenarios.

It is particularly interesting to see the parallels in process, and made me question whether experience designers should actually be working far further up the design chain than we currently do, in order to affect real change. How can we become more involved in overarching business model strategy, that all affects the end user experience in the end? Can we truly design great user experiences without be involved earlier in the process? Is this where true innovation is able to occur?

Overall, the book was a great read for anyone that’s interested in innovation and design, and I can see it being a great resource to have on that bookshelf.

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Book Review: Outliers – The Story of Success http://sherylyulin.com/2012/02/24/book-outliers-the-story-of-success/ http://sherylyulin.com/2012/02/24/book-outliers-the-story-of-success/#comments Fri, 24 Feb 2012 04:34:05 +0000 sheryl http://sherylyulin.com/?p=1437 Outliers – The Story of Success by Malcolm Gladwell

This is a superbly interesting book that looks in depth into the lives of “outliers” and the circumstances that cumulatively lead up to their successes.

I initially started reading this book just for fun, as the I thought the topic was particularly interesting – but ]]> Outliers – The Story of Success by Malcolm Gladwell

This is a superbly interesting book that looks in depth into the lives of “outliers” and the circumstances that cumulatively lead up to their successes.

I initially started reading this book just for fun, as the I thought the topic was particularly interesting – but the book offers more than that. Told through a series of different scenarios and life stories across different talent fields from ice hockey, to computer geniuses, through to lawyers, you can’t help but assess your own life story as you read along.

The notion of hard work, mastery and autonomy arose often, reminding me much of the same ideas surfaced in Dan Pink’s “Drive – The suprising truth about what motivates us” – where it’s suggested that the things that motivate us are actually autonomy, mastery and purpose. My favourite quotes:

… three things – autonomy, complexity, and a connection between effort and reward – are, most people agree, the three qualities that work has to have if it is to be satisfying

On working hard:

if you work hard enough, and assert yourself, and use your mind and imagination, you can shape the world to your desires

On persistance:

Success is a function of persistence and doggedness and the willingness to work hard for twenty-two minutes to make sense of something that most people would give up on after thirty seconds.

Gladwell also discusses the notion that the typical measure of intelligence we use via “IQ” tests on its own is not a measure of success. The notion of “practical intelligence” from Robert Sternberg, or “social savvy” as opposed to analytical intelligence, is the kind of knowledge we acquire significantly through our families.

Another interesting idea raised is the notion of cultural differences, and how our cultural background has a large affect on how we interact in the world. In particular, cross-cultural differences can provide us with an interesting lens on which to gather insights when designing meaningful experiences for the user.

Another key factor mentioned is merely the luck of being in the right place, at the right time. Being born in a certain window of time. Being lucky enough to receive an opportunity, but also being bold enough to seize the opportunity:

Outliers are those who have been given opportunities – and who have had the strength and presence of mind to seize them.

In the end, this book inspires you to want to work harder at the things you love most!

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Video: Kinect Puppet Parade http://sherylyulin.com/2012/02/13/video-kinect-puppet-parade/ http://sherylyulin.com/2012/02/13/video-kinect-puppet-parade/#comments Mon, 13 Feb 2012 09:07:41 +0000 sheryl http://sherylyulin.com/?p=1428 via CoDesign:

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Video: MotionPhone iPad http://sherylyulin.com/2012/02/13/video-motionphone-ipad/ http://sherylyulin.com/2012/02/13/video-motionphone-ipad/#comments Mon, 13 Feb 2012 07:33:59 +0000 sheryl http://sherylyulin.com/?p=1426 http://www.fastcodesign.com/1668901/after-17-years-scott-snibbe-resurrects-animated-art-project-as-ipad-app via CoDesign: http://www.fastcodesign.com/1668901/after-17-years-scott-snibbe-resurrects-animated-art-project-as-ipad-app

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Grammy Awards partner with CBS for digital experience http://sherylyulin.com/2012/02/06/grammy-awards-partner-with-cbs-for-digital-experience/ http://sherylyulin.com/2012/02/06/grammy-awards-partner-with-cbs-for-digital-experience/#comments Mon, 06 Feb 2012 01:44:20 +0000 sheryl http://sherylyulin.com/?p=1409 This will be an interesting partnership. According to the article below one of the key issues is speed to delivering broadcast content online in a reasonable amount of time. And also keen to see how the two or three screen experience plays out.

via GigaOm – Grammy Awards partner with CBS for digital experience. This will be an interesting partnership. According to the article below one of the key issues is speed to delivering broadcast content online in a reasonable amount of time. And also keen to see how the two or three screen experience plays out.

via GigaOm – Grammy Awards partner with CBS for digital experience.

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Video: A Day Made Of Glass 2 http://sherylyulin.com/2012/02/06/video-a-day-made-of-glass-2/ http://sherylyulin.com/2012/02/06/video-a-day-made-of-glass-2/#comments Mon, 06 Feb 2012 01:34:39 +0000 sheryl http://sherylyulin.com/?p=1416 via Engagdet: http://www.engadget.com/2012/02/05/corning-looks-to-the-future-mainly-right-through-it-video/ via Engagdet: http://www.engadget.com/2012/02/05/corning-looks-to-the-future-mainly-right-through-it-video/

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Video: Healthcare in the cloud – Qualcomm 2net http://sherylyulin.com/2012/02/01/video-healthcare-in-the-cloud-qualcomm-2net/ http://sherylyulin.com/2012/02/01/video-healthcare-in-the-cloud-qualcomm-2net/#comments Wed, 01 Feb 2012 21:52:29 +0000 sheryl http://sherylyulin.com/?p=1390 Healthcare in the cloud: an exclusive look at Qualcomm 2net | The Verge.

Healthcare in the cloud: an exclusive look at Qualcomm 2net | The Verge.

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Link: 6 Big HealthTech Ideas That Will Change Medicine In 2012 http://sherylyulin.com/2012/02/01/link-6-big-healthtech-ideas-that-will-change-medicine-in-2012/ http://sherylyulin.com/2012/02/01/link-6-big-healthtech-ideas-that-will-change-medicine-in-2012/#comments Wed, 01 Feb 2012 21:51:38 +0000 sheryl http://sherylyulin.com/?p=1392 6 Big HealthTech Ideas That Will Change Medicine In 2012 | TechCrunch. 6 Big HealthTech Ideas That Will Change Medicine In 2012 | TechCrunch.

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